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Andrew W. Moore, University of Cambridge NetFPGA: The Flexible Open-Source Networking Platform

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What
  • Colloquium Series
When Nov 14, 2013
from 02:00 PM to 03:00 PM
Where Location: IF-4.31/4.33
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The NetFPGA is an open platform enabling researchers and instructors to build high-speed, hardware-accelerated networking systems. The NetFPGA is the de-facto experimental platform for line-rate implementations of network research and it continues with a new generation platform capable of 4x10Gbps.

The target audience is not restricted to hardware researchers: the NetFPGA provides the ideal platform for research across a wide range of networking topics from architecture to algorithms and from energy-efficient design to routing and forwarding. The most prominent NetFPGA success is OpenFlow, which in turn has reignited the Software Defined Networking movement. NetFPGA enabled OpenFlow by providing a widely available open-source development platform capable of line-rate and was, until its commercial uptake, the reference platform for OpenFlow. NetFPGA enables high-impact network research.

This seminar will combine presentation and (pre-recorded) demonstration; no knowledge of hardware programming languages (eg Verilog/VHDL) is required.

Bio:

Andrew W. Moore is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory in England, where he is part of the Systems Research Group working on issues of network and computer architecture. His research interests include enabling open-source network research and education using the NetFPGA platform; other research pursuits include low-power energy-aware networking, and novel network and systems data-center architectures. He holds B.Comp. and M.Comp. degrees from Monash University and a Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge. He is a chartered engineer with the IET and a member of the IEEE, ACM and USENIX.

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