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Past events

Event Don Sannella: Contemplate: LFCS -> Wall Street (MF2, from Aug 07, 2012 01:00 PM to Aug 07, 2012 02:00 PM)
 
Event Stratis Viglas: Solid-state and asymmetric I/O (MF2, from Jul 31, 2012 01:00 PM to Jul 31, 2012 02:00 PM)
 
Event Ian Stark: CerCo: Certified Complexity (MF2, from Jul 24, 2012 01:00 PM to Jul 24, 2012 02:00 PM)
 
Event LFCS Seminar: Dana Moshkovitz (IF 4.31-4.33, from Jul 13, 2012 02:00 PM to Jul 13, 2012 03:00 PM)
Projection Games
Event Amelie Gheerbrant: Green Smoothie Tasting and Logics on Trees (MF2, from Jul 10, 2012 01:00 PM to Jul 10, 2012 02:00 PM)
The talk will starts with some green smoothie tasting. The green smoothie (banana, pear, spinash, ginger, lemon, spirulina) will be made on site with the help of my famous Vitamix blender. I will then use the energy boost provided by the beverage in order to expose a model theoretic technique that I developed in my PhD thesis. The technique combines methods from classical and from finite model theory and it can be used in order to show the completeness of axiomatizations of fragments of monadic second-order logic on finite trees. I will mention a recent follow up of that work, as well as some new directions I have in mind. Bring your glass!
Event LFCS Seminar: Navin Goyal (IF 4.31-33, from Jun 28, 2012 04:00 PM to Jun 28, 2012 05:00 PM)
Analysis of Thompson Sampling for the Multi-armed Bandit Problem
Event Laura Meagher: Impact Evaluation: Making Knowledge Exchange Visible (MF2, from Jun 26, 2012 01:00 PM to Jun 26, 2012 02:00 PM)
As increasing attention is paid to influences of research beyond academia, complementary challenges exist: generating impacts and capturing impacts. Impacts can take place over the long-term and can take multiple forms, some of them quite subtle.Insights from across numerous impact evaluations of research initiatives and funding schemes illuminate: 1) ways in which impacts can be articulated and 2) ways in which knowledge exchange can lead to impacts.
Event Guido Sanguinetti: Machine learning for continuous time Markov chains (from Jun 19, 2012 01:00 PM to Jun 19, 2012 02:00 PM)
Continuous Time Markov Chains (CTMCs) play a key role in many areas of the physical and computational sciences. My own interest in CTMCs sparks from their use as models of biochemical reaction systems. Frequently, in biology, we can also obtain time-resolved observations of (some parts) of the system; however, the system is frequently not fully characterised, both in terms of its parametrisation and in terms of the structure of the underlying reaction network. Here, I will give a rather tutorial introduction to how ideas from machine learning could be used to perform statistical inference for CTMC systems. I'm aiming to explain both the fundamental ideas and some key derivations, but I may be overoptimistic and would welcome an interactive approach.
Event LFCS Seminar: Alberto Policriti (IF 4.31-4.33, from Jun 12, 2012 04:00 PM to Jun 12, 2012 05:00 PM)
The decidability of the Bernays-Schoenfinkel-Ramsey class in Set Theory
Event Rahul Santhanam: The Case of the New Menard (from Jun 12, 2012 01:00 PM to Jun 12, 2012 02:00 PM)
You're called upon to be sleuths and judges in a real-life academic mystery. (Clue: Yong Sun)
Event LFCS Seminar: Valentine Kabanets (IF 4.31-33, from Jun 08, 2012 02:00 PM to Jun 08, 2012 03:00 PM)
Lower bounds against weakly uniform circuits
Event LFCS Seminar: Andrew Pitts (IF 4.31-33, from May 29, 2012 04:00 PM to May 29, 2012 05:00 PM)
Nominal Scott Domains
Event Richard Mayr: Genetic Testing: What can you learn from it? (from May 29, 2012 01:00 PM to May 29, 2012 02:00 PM)
Genotyping and even full genome sequencing is rapidly becoming more accessible to the general public. This talk gives an overview of the current techniques and their implications, focusing on the following questions. What kinds of people have their genes tested, and for which reasons? How do current genotyping methods work? What can you learn from your test results?
Event LFCS Seminar: Thomas Streicher (IF 2.33, from May 24, 2012 02:00 PM to May 24, 2012 03:00 PM)
Computability in Quantum Theory
Event LFCS Seminar: Alin Stefanescu (IF 4.31-4.33, from May 15, 2012 04:00 PM to May 15, 2012 05:00 PM)
Test generation and model learning for Event-B
Event Murray Cole: Why Parallel Programming is Hard, and What We Should Do About It (from May 15, 2012 01:00 PM to May 15, 2012 02:00 PM)
Technological trends dictate that future commodity hardware will be highly parallel and heterogeneous. We will need programming models and tools which allow us to develop software which is performance portable, productively constructed, and energy aware(not to mention correct). I will offer opinions as to why current de facto standard approaches are not appropriate, and why a methodology based around the exploitation of patterns is the way forward.
Event Leonid Libkin: Atacama desert and incomplete information (from May 08, 2012 01:00 PM to May 08, 2012 02:00 PM)
Atacama desert is the driest place on earth and is so similar to Mars that Nasa uses it to test instruments for its Mars missions. As any other desert, it has oases which be used as nice escape places to discuss reseacrh. Running a workshop there would entail a not-so-short trip from Santiago (which takes a full day to get to from here), so I’ll tell you about the place first, and then briefly mention one question discussed there. It has to do with the old idea of connecting powerdomains with incompleteness in databases. It had to be revisited lately; I’ll tell you why, and then we’ll see how Gordon’s name (Plotkin powerdomain) appears in a somewhat unusual context.
Event LFCS Seminar: Phil Wadler (IF 4.31-33, from May 03, 2012 02:00 PM to May 03, 2012 03:00 PM)
Propositions as Sessions
Event Vijayanand Nagarajan: Towards Semantics-directed Hardware Memory Consistency (Mini Forum 2, from May 01, 2012 01:00 PM to May 01, 2012 02:00 PM)
The memory consistency model which mandates what value a memory read can return, is at the heart of shared memory concurrency. With regard to memory consistency models, an inherent trade-off between programmability and performance is presumed. For instance, it is thought that implementing sequential consistency (SC) would be too expensive as it is presumed that it would preclude hardware optimisations such as write-buffering. In this talk, we show that prior hardware SC implementations are overly restrictive in that they do not exploit most of the concurrency opportunities allowed by SC. We proceed to show how SC can be implemented efficiently while retaining hardware optimisations such as write-buffering. We conclude by arguing for semantics-directed hardware design for realising programmable, yet efficient shared memory consistency models.
Event LFCS Seminar: Fred Long (IF G.03, from Apr 20, 2012 11:00 AM to Apr 20, 2012 12:00 PM)
The CERT Oracle Secure Coding Standard for Java

Also in this section

Event Don Sannella: Contemplate: LFCS -> Wall Street (MF2, from Aug 07, 2012 01:00 PM to Aug 07, 2012 02:00 PM)
 
Event Stratis Viglas: Solid-state and asymmetric I/O (MF2, from Jul 31, 2012 01:00 PM to Jul 31, 2012 02:00 PM)
 
Event Ian Stark: CerCo: Certified Complexity (MF2, from Jul 24, 2012 01:00 PM to Jul 24, 2012 02:00 PM)
 
Event LFCS Seminar: Dana Moshkovitz (IF 4.31-4.33, from Jul 13, 2012 02:00 PM to Jul 13, 2012 03:00 PM)
Projection Games
Event Amelie Gheerbrant: Green Smoothie Tasting and Logics on Trees (MF2, from Jul 10, 2012 01:00 PM to Jul 10, 2012 02:00 PM)
The talk will starts with some green smoothie tasting. The green smoothie (banana, pear, spinash, ginger, lemon, spirulina) will be made on site with the help of my famous Vitamix blender. I will then use the energy boost provided by the beverage in order to expose a model theoretic technique that I developed in my PhD thesis. The technique combines methods from classical and from finite model theory and it can be used in order to show the completeness of axiomatizations of fragments of monadic second-order logic on finite trees. I will mention a recent follow up of that work, as well as some new directions I have in mind. Bring your glass!
Event LFCS Seminar: Navin Goyal (IF 4.31-33, from Jun 28, 2012 04:00 PM to Jun 28, 2012 05:00 PM)
Analysis of Thompson Sampling for the Multi-armed Bandit Problem
Event Laura Meagher: Impact Evaluation: Making Knowledge Exchange Visible (MF2, from Jun 26, 2012 01:00 PM to Jun 26, 2012 02:00 PM)
As increasing attention is paid to influences of research beyond academia, complementary challenges exist: generating impacts and capturing impacts. Impacts can take place over the long-term and can take multiple forms, some of them quite subtle.Insights from across numerous impact evaluations of research initiatives and funding schemes illuminate: 1) ways in which impacts can be articulated and 2) ways in which knowledge exchange can lead to impacts.
Event Guido Sanguinetti: Machine learning for continuous time Markov chains (from Jun 19, 2012 01:00 PM to Jun 19, 2012 02:00 PM)
Continuous Time Markov Chains (CTMCs) play a key role in many areas of the physical and computational sciences. My own interest in CTMCs sparks from their use as models of biochemical reaction systems. Frequently, in biology, we can also obtain time-resolved observations of (some parts) of the system; however, the system is frequently not fully characterised, both in terms of its parametrisation and in terms of the structure of the underlying reaction network. Here, I will give a rather tutorial introduction to how ideas from machine learning could be used to perform statistical inference for CTMC systems. I'm aiming to explain both the fundamental ideas and some key derivations, but I may be overoptimistic and would welcome an interactive approach.
Event LFCS Seminar: Alberto Policriti (IF 4.31-4.33, from Jun 12, 2012 04:00 PM to Jun 12, 2012 05:00 PM)
The decidability of the Bernays-Schoenfinkel-Ramsey class in Set Theory
Event Rahul Santhanam: The Case of the New Menard (from Jun 12, 2012 01:00 PM to Jun 12, 2012 02:00 PM)
You're called upon to be sleuths and judges in a real-life academic mystery. (Clue: Yong Sun)
Event LFCS Seminar: Valentine Kabanets (IF 4.31-33, from Jun 08, 2012 02:00 PM to Jun 08, 2012 03:00 PM)
Lower bounds against weakly uniform circuits
Event LFCS Seminar: Andrew Pitts (IF 4.31-33, from May 29, 2012 04:00 PM to May 29, 2012 05:00 PM)
Nominal Scott Domains
Event Richard Mayr: Genetic Testing: What can you learn from it? (from May 29, 2012 01:00 PM to May 29, 2012 02:00 PM)
Genotyping and even full genome sequencing is rapidly becoming more accessible to the general public. This talk gives an overview of the current techniques and their implications, focusing on the following questions. What kinds of people have their genes tested, and for which reasons? How do current genotyping methods work? What can you learn from your test results?
Event LFCS Seminar: Thomas Streicher (IF 2.33, from May 24, 2012 02:00 PM to May 24, 2012 03:00 PM)
Computability in Quantum Theory
Event LFCS Seminar: Alin Stefanescu (IF 4.31-4.33, from May 15, 2012 04:00 PM to May 15, 2012 05:00 PM)
Test generation and model learning for Event-B
Event Murray Cole: Why Parallel Programming is Hard, and What We Should Do About It (from May 15, 2012 01:00 PM to May 15, 2012 02:00 PM)
Technological trends dictate that future commodity hardware will be highly parallel and heterogeneous. We will need programming models and tools which allow us to develop software which is performance portable, productively constructed, and energy aware(not to mention correct). I will offer opinions as to why current de facto standard approaches are not appropriate, and why a methodology based around the exploitation of patterns is the way forward.
Event Leonid Libkin: Atacama desert and incomplete information (from May 08, 2012 01:00 PM to May 08, 2012 02:00 PM)
Atacama desert is the driest place on earth and is so similar to Mars that Nasa uses it to test instruments for its Mars missions. As any other desert, it has oases which be used as nice escape places to discuss reseacrh. Running a workshop there would entail a not-so-short trip from Santiago (which takes a full day to get to from here), so I’ll tell you about the place first, and then briefly mention one question discussed there. It has to do with the old idea of connecting powerdomains with incompleteness in databases. It had to be revisited lately; I’ll tell you why, and then we’ll see how Gordon’s name (Plotkin powerdomain) appears in a somewhat unusual context.
Event LFCS Seminar: Phil Wadler (IF 4.31-33, from May 03, 2012 02:00 PM to May 03, 2012 03:00 PM)
Propositions as Sessions
Event Vijayanand Nagarajan: Towards Semantics-directed Hardware Memory Consistency (Mini Forum 2, from May 01, 2012 01:00 PM to May 01, 2012 02:00 PM)
The memory consistency model which mandates what value a memory read can return, is at the heart of shared memory concurrency. With regard to memory consistency models, an inherent trade-off between programmability and performance is presumed. For instance, it is thought that implementing sequential consistency (SC) would be too expensive as it is presumed that it would preclude hardware optimisations such as write-buffering. In this talk, we show that prior hardware SC implementations are overly restrictive in that they do not exploit most of the concurrency opportunities allowed by SC. We proceed to show how SC can be implemented efficiently while retaining hardware optimisations such as write-buffering. We conclude by arguing for semantics-directed hardware design for realising programmable, yet efficient shared memory consistency models.
Event LFCS Seminar: Fred Long (IF G.03, from Apr 20, 2012 11:00 AM to Apr 20, 2012 12:00 PM)
The CERT Oracle Secure Coding Standard for Java
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